NOTE: This is a long, information-packed article on How to Create an Alternative Medicine Chest, Natural First Aid Kit. To make it easier to navigate, use the Table of Contents button to your right!

How to Build an Alternative Medicine Chest

1. The first step to building your natural medicine chest is to write down exactly what you need on a regular basis and what you need on an occasional basis.

A multivitamin, calcium supplement (if you're a woman over 35), extra folic acid (if you are hoping to get pregnant), valerian root if you have occasional trouble sleeping, white willow bark if you need something for headaches on occasion, arnica for those times when you need a natural pain reliever. This is how you stock your natural medicine chest.

2. Write down your needs based on conditions or symptoms, what has worked for you, what you need to look into or ask your doctor about, and anything else you can think of. Remember you can include tinctures, capsules, pills both herbal and homeopathic.



3. You can also base your decisions on the seasonal calendar. Herbs for seasonal healing are an important element in deciding just what is necessary at the time. Each season has it's own particular beneficial herbs for healing particular conditions during that time period. Remember, this is also geared towards the region of the world you live in. For a reference of current seasonal herbs to use, see this page.

4. If you're trying to “go herbal” with your medicine chest, discuss any conditions you have with your acupuncturist, naturopath or holistic practitioner. Be advised that asking your allopathic doctor probably does not have the knowledge about herbs that a holistic practitioner has.

Some physicians dislike the idea of herbal remedies, primarily because of patients who use them without the proper information or precautions. A healer of any kind, be them holistic or allopathic should be searching for the power in the greater good. Many doctors now try to include those options for their patients.

And if a doctor who is open to natural remedies advises against it, trust that judgment. Work with the practitioner on contraindications for the herb when you are considering taking them with allopathic medicine. There could very well be side effects. So when you've decided what your needs are, see your doctor, then decide which remedies you will need to take on a daily basis for an extended period of time.

5. Doses are always a question and what herbal remedies are good for which conditions, but another step in the natural health process is to decide exactly how much of each item you need. Check our Western Materia Medica (below) for the safe and trustworthy information you need.

Get your dried, organic herbs, organic essential oils, bulk spices, loose leaf organic teas and aromatherapy supplies at the place where we shop – StarWest Botanicals!

Seasonal Herbs for Your Medicine Chest

Herbal medicine is the best alternative therapy when it comes to finding a substitute for allopathic drugs. The benefits are tremendous. Side effects are minimal. Caution should be used when taking herbal medicine with allopathic drugs.

Certain herbs can be very beneficial during particular seasons based on their mechanism of action and their healing properties. As the seasons change, it is a great idea to create a seasonal medicine chest with herbs that you can really utilize during that period.

You will find that herbs in many forms can be both practical and versatile. Below are considerations for each season.

  • Spring is the season of new beginnings and rebirth. Using herbs to tonify and detox the liver and gallbladder are recommended. Consider making a Spring Herbal Medicine Chest with milk thistle, dandelion and nettle. You can benefit by having Spring Essential Oils such as jasmine, neroli and patchouli.
  • Summer is the high season of greatest Yang and activity is complemented by the hot fun-filled days at the beach and warm, delightful nights enjoyed outdoors. We tend to overdue in summer..too much sun, physical activities and food. Using herbs to tonify the heart, intestines and stomach are recommended. Consider making a Summer Herbal Medicine Chest with basil, elderflower and chamomile. You can benefit by having Summer Essential Oils such as tea tree, lavender and eucalyptus.
  • Fall is the time of gathering and harvesting in preparation for the next season. Using herbs to tonify the lungs and large intestines is recommended. With the changing of light and the dropping of temperatures, consider making a Fall Herbal Medicine Chest with astragalus, calendula and ginseng. You can benefit by having Fall Essential Oils such as bergamont, cedarwood and clove.
  • Winter is the time for rest and replenishing. It is the season of greatest Yin and should be observed with peaceful tranquility. Using herbs to tonify the kidneys and urinary bladder is recommended. Consider making a Winter Herbal Medicine Chest with sage, mullein and garlic. You can benefit by having Winter Essential Oils such as cinnamon, ginger and peppermint.

Spring Herbs

Spring brings cleansing and rejuvenation. Most often the liver is the target of a cleansing regimen, since the liver is one of the most important organs in the body. It processes our hormones, contributes to proper digestion, cleanses the body of toxins, and many other important duties.

A good cleansing regimen, however, will also cleanse and support other vital organs, such as heart, kidneys, blood, and digestive system. It will also do wonderful things for your spirit! It is vital to consume lots of water, with lemon is ideal, and get fresh air to flush these toxins out of your system.

Dandelion Root

Dandelion Root can be made into a bitter tea (don't sweeten it, the bitterness is how it works – you'll get use to it) as an excellent tonic for the liver and blood purifier. Dandelion roots are very high in vitamins and minerals.

The common dandelion is an unusually nutritious food. Its leaves contain substantial levels of vitamins A, C, D, and B complex as well as iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, manganese, copper, choline, calcium, boron, and silicon. Worldwide, the root of the dandelion has been used for the treatment of a variety of liver and gallbladder problems.

Other historical uses of the root and leaves include the treatment of breast diseases, water retention, digestive problems, joint pain, fever, and skin diseases. The most active constituents in dandelion appear to be eudesmanolide and germacranolide, substances unique to this herb.

Milk Thistle

Milk Thistle is the best in cleaning our blood and liver and is a traditional way to get our health back on track and revitalize and nourish our entire internal ecological system from the ravages of winter. Milk Thistle is an excellent cleanser for the liver. Cleansing is one of the more important roles of Milk Thistle as it helps to prevent a host of problems our bodies can acquire from internal and external toxic overload.

Burdock Root

Burdock root helps to purify blood and restore the liver to aid in a restful sleep. Helps to reduce build up of toxins in the skin resulting in boils. Helps gallbladder functions and stimulates the immune system. Seed forms are also used.

Nettle

Nettles are invaluable as a food, rich in vitamins and minerals. Only the young, tender tips are suitable for cooking, the stalks and lower leaves are not edible. They can be cooked then pureed for soup or vegetable accompaniment.

Nettles make a valuable tonic after the winter and are an excellent remedy for anemia, their vitamin C content ensures that the iron they contain is properly absorbed. Nettles increase the quality of the blood helping to give a healthy glow to the skin.

Yellow Dock

Yellow Dock is applicable to all the purposes for which the other species are used. The root has laxative, alterative and mildly tonic action, and can be freely used as a tonic and laxative in rheumatism, bilious complaints and as an astringent in piles, bleeding of the lungs, etc. It is largely prescribed for diseases of the blood, from a spring eruption, to scurvy, scrofula and chronic skin diseases. It is also useful in jaundice and as a tonic to the stomach and the system generally.

It has an action on the bowels very similar to that of Rhubarb, being perhaps a little less active, but operating without pain or uneasiness. Rumicin is the active principle of the Yellow Dock, and from the root, containing Chrysarobin, a dried extract is prepared officially, of which from 1 to 4 grains may be given for a dose in a pill. This is useful for relieving a congested liver, as well as for scrofulous skin diseases.

Echinacea

First used by the Indigenous North Americans who harvested the plants for extensive use in the treatment of infectious wounds and burns or eruptive skin complaints. It enhances the phagocytic activity of white blood cells- identifying and retiring bacterial, viral and fungal infections, in addition to the clearance of these from the lymphatic system. Higher doses are often used for affecting acute immune responses.

Astragalus

To be used after colds or infection to help rebuild immunity, Astragalus is a sweet-tasting herb effective in restoring both resilience to future respiratory infections, and efficiency of metabolism to ensure optimal nutrition for immune reserves to fight off those spring colds. This herb is the best for restoring energy to the body very quickly.

Garlic

Garlic was worshiped by the ancient Egyptians, chewed by Greek Olympian athletes and thought to be essential for keeping vampires at bay! But it is also good for zapping bacteria, keeping your heart healthy, warding off coughs and colds. Garlic is an antibiotic that can actually kill infecting bacteria and at the same time protect the body from the poisons that are causing the infection.

It is known that the most sensitive bacterium to garlic is the deadly Bacillus anthracis which produces the poison anthrax. Vapor from freshly cut garlic can kill bacteria at a distance of 20 cms!

Marshmallow

Marshmallow stimulates the immune system and the production of white blood cells. It also soothes inflammation, slows production of mucus, and reduces sugar levels in the body.

Summer Herbs

Summer. The high season of greatest Yang and activity is complemented by the hot fun-filled days at the beach and warm, delightful nights enjoyed outdoors. As we tend to overdue in summer..too much sun, working out and physical activities; below you can find some of the best herbs for headaches, burns, and skin problems.

Also herbs for strengthening the respiratory tract, maintain sinus passages, support for healthy circulation and herbs to sooth the discomfort of sore joints and muscles.

Basil

The Leaves; frequently, the entire herb (all aerial parts) are harvested. Besth arvesting season is before flowering. Basil leaves should always be used fresh, as they lose most of their flavor within a few weeks after drying or as an essential oil. The essential oil (less than 1%) is of complex and variable composition.

Within the species, several different chemical races exist, and furthermore climate, soil and time of harvest influence not only the amount but also the composition of the essential oil. The most important aroma components are 1,8 cineol, linalool, citral, methyl chavicol (estragole), eugenol and methyl cinnamate, although not necessarily in this order; in fact, hardly any basil contains all of these compounds in significant amounts.

Chamomile, German and Roman

An herb of the sun, Chamomile's bright yellow flowers bring power and light to your space and rituals. Chamomile's medicinal properties range from skin inflammations to lightening hair to treating digestive problems.

As a mild sedative, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial, it improves digestion by relaxing the muscles throughout the gastrointestinal system and it can induce an overall sense of calm and well-being.

Dandelion

The common dandelion is an unusually nutritious food. Its leaves contain substantial levels of vitamins A, C, D, and B complex as well as iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, manganese, copper, choline, calcium, boron, and silicon.

Worldwide, the root of the dandelion has been used for the treatment of a variety of liver and gallbladder problems. Other historical uses of the root and leaves include the treatment of breast diseases, water retention, digestive problems, joint pain, fever, and skin diseases.

The most active constituents in dandelion appear to be eudesmanolide and germacranolide, substances unique to this herb. Other ingredients include taraxol, taraxerol, and taraxasterol, along with stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol, caffeic acid, and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid.

Dill

The summer herb of the season, Dill like the other umbelliferous fruits and volatile oils, both Dill fruit and oil of Dill possess stimulant, aromatic, carminative and stomachic properties, making them of considerable medicinal value.

Oil of Dill is used in mixtures, or administered in doses of 5 drops on sugar, but its most common use is in the preparation of Dill Water, which is a common domestic remedy for the flatulence of infants, and is a useful vehicle for children's medicine generally.

Elderflower

Elder flowers are highly effective in managing upper respiratory congestion and infections. Picked from the elder tree in mid to late summer, they seem to capture the dry warmth of this time of year, perfect for drying up that runny or blocked nose.

These tiny pale white flowers have a delicate floral taste and contain flavonoids and small amounts of mucilage and tannins, a perfect combination for soothing healing and protecting mucous membranes. An old tradition was to make fresh Elderflower wine in summer ready to drink in winter…Food as medicine?

Fennel

Fennel, a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb, with yellow flowers and feathery leaves, grows wild in most parts of temperate Europe, but is generally considered indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean, as it spreads eastwards to India. It has followed civilization, especially where Italians have colonized, and may be found growing wild in many parts of the world upon dry soils near the sea-coast and upon riverbanks.

On account of its aromatic and carminative properties, Fennel fruit is chiefly used medicinally with purgatives to allay their tendency to griping and for this purpose forms one of the ingredients of the well-known compound licorice powder.

Fennel water has properties similar to those of anise and dill water: mixed with sodium bicarbonate and syrup, these waters constitute the domestic ‘Gripe Water,' used to correct the flatulence of infants. Volatile oil of Fennel has these properties in concentration. Fennel tea, formerly also employed as a carminative, is made by pouring half a pint of boiling water on a teaspoonful of bruised Fennel seeds.

Get your dried, organic herbs, organic essential oils, bulk spices, loose leaf organic teas and aromatherapy supplies at the place where we shop – StarWest Botanicals!

Lavender

Lavender is laid on the fires of the Summer Solstice and is soothing to the spirit. Good for stress and depression as reflected in the skin. These flowers pressed into essential oil form can relieve stress and depression.

Good for headaches, burns, and skin problems. It is analgesic, anti-coagulant, anti-convulsive, anti-depressant, anti-fungal, anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, anti-toxic, cardiotonic, and is a sedative. It has a very balancing effect on the body, emotions, mind and spirit.

Pine

Pine Needle was used by the ancient Romans and Greeks to treat respiratory problems and muscular aches. A holiday staple, this fantastic scent is often used to accent potpourri and diffused into the air. It promotes a healthy immune and musculoskeletal system.

Distilled in Austria from the finest pines, Pine Needle can be diffused to help strengthen the respiratory tract and maintain sinus passages. When massaged into the skin, Pine Needle supports healthy circulation and soothes the discomfort of sore joints and muscles.

A true disinfectant, a strong germ killer, excellent for viral infections and for muscular aches, rheumatism and arthritis. In this aspect, Pine is used for its properties of purification. It represents the Male aspects of the Divine at this time. Consider burning Pine with Meadowsweet for an incense of energetic balance.

Rose

The Mother of All Flowers, the Rose has amazing powers of love, trust and self acceptance. Roses are representative of faith, hope and love and has the qualities to restore the very center of one's being. A gentle tonic of the heart, Rose oil's psychological properties lie mainly in its effect on the mind,the center of our emotional being. Rose oil calms and supports the heart and helps to nourish the soul!

Also symbolizing the feminine, red is the color of choice for Roses used or gathered at Midsummer. Long associated with the eternity of true love, at Midsummer this flower also blesses the Sacred Union.

St. John's Wort

Aromatic, astringent, resolvent, and expectorant. Used in all pulmonary complaints, bladder troubles, in suppression of urine, dysentery, worms, diarrhea, hysteria and nervous depression, and other hemorrhages and jaundice.

The flowers, leaves, and stems are all utilized and may help to inhibit viral infections, including herpes. Good for depression and nerve pain. The Welsh called this plant the “leaf of the blessed”, believing it to be the ideal combination of water with fire, and between light and dark, night and day, making it a perfect celebratory herb at Midsummer.

Thyme

The pungent oils found in Thyme are an effective antimicrobial in the treatment of respiratory infections. When taking Thyme, people often note tasting it on their breath as the oils permeate through the respiratory system to reduce the proliferation of viruses during infections.

It also warms the digestion and reduces metabolic congestion, aiding to clear the body of conditions for infection.

Tea Tree

This germicide and antibacterial oil is great for cleaning infected wounds or as a gargle for a sore throat — use a 10-percent solution but use pure 100-percent tea tree oil. This essential oil is a disinfectant and good in healing all skin conditions including acne, athlete's foot, nail fungus, herpes outbreaks, insect bites, warts, cuts and scrapes, scabies, vaginitis.

Fall Herbs

With the change of seasons from Summer to Fall we need to change our supplies in our medicine cabinet. With cooler weather comes a different set of illnesses that can be nipped in the bud with the right medicinals.

  • Arnica (Arnica montana): This year round herb helps stop pain. Use this for arthritic aches, often set off by seasonal changes. Rub the tincture, cream, or gel on sore spots, Do not use on broken skin.
  • Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceous): Take two capsules of this antiviral herb twice a day to prevent or treat colds and flu. Look for astragalus products standardized to 15 percent polysaccharides.
  • Calendula (calendula officinalis): Use calendula tinctures, oil, lotions, or creams to soothe chapped skin and lips. Look for products with at least 10 percent extract of Calendula.
  • Chamomile (Matricaria recutita): This soothing herb works great as a dust-irritant reliever. Brew a cup of tea and let it cool. Place the room temperature tea soaked in cotton on your eyes. Drink a cup of chamomile tea for upset stomachs, heartburn, indigestion, or to promote relaxation.
  • Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea): Treat colds, flu, sore throat, and other common infections with this natural enhancer of immune system function. It's sold as tinctures and extracts, as well as capsules and tablets. When you feel something coming on, take two capsules of freeze-dried extract four times a day or a dropperful of tincture, in water, four times a day.
  • Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba): Take ginkgo for low circulation or insufficient blood flow, mental fuzziness, memory loss, or vertigo. Take 120 milligrams per day in divided doses with food. Look for products with 24-percent flavonoid glycosides, or else 5- to 7- percent terpene lactones (including 3 percent ginkgolides) .
  • Siberian ginseng (Eleutheroccocus senticosus): This treatment for lethargy and fatigue also boosts resilience to environmental stresses. Take two capsules, or one dropperful of tincture, twice a day or as a tea 2-3 times a day — unless directed otherwise.
  • Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia): This germicide and antibacterial oil is great for cleaning infected wounds or as a gargle for a sore throat — use a 10-percent solution but use pure 100-percent tea tree oil.
  • Triphala: An Ayurvedic Indian herbal mixture, triphala is a remedy for constipation and poor bowel tone. Take only the capsules and avoid triphala in powdered form.
  • Valerian (Valeriana officinalis): An assistant to sound sleep and a treatment for insomnia, Valerian comes in tincture, extract, or tablet form. Use one teaspoon of the tincture in a quarter cup of water, or take one or two tablets at bedtime.

Get your dried, organic herbs, organic essential oils, bulk spices, loose leaf organic teas and aromatherapy supplies at the place where we shop – StarWest Botanicals!

Winter Herbs

Several herbs are effective for treating not only the symptoms of too much winter, but the causes of colds and flu – Impaired immunity to virus/bacteria, maintaining blood circulation and warmth, ensuring vitality of the lungs and reducing the build up of congestion in the body.

Ginger

Ginger is used for the prevention and treatment of various forms of nausea. These include motion sickness, the nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (morning sickness), and post-surgical nausea.

Note: If you are pregnant or undergoing surgery, do not self-treat with ginger except under physician supervision. Weak evidence suggests ginger might be helpful for osteoarthritis.

Ginger has been suggested as a treatment for numerous other conditions, including atherosclerosis, migraine headaches, rheumatoid arthritis, high cholesterol, burns, ulcers, depression, impotence, and liver toxicity. Stops cough and stops vomiting. In traditional Chinese medicine, hot ginger tea taken at the first sign of a cold is believed to offer the possibility of averting the infection.

Elderflower

Elderflowers are highly effective in managing upper respiratory congestion and infections. Picked from the elder tree in mid to late summer, they seem to capture the dry warmth of this time of year, perfect for drying up that runny or blocked nose.

These tiny pale white flowers have a delicate floral taste and contain flavonoids and small amounts of mucilage and tannins, a perfect combination for soothing healing and protecting mucous membranes. An old tradition was to make fresh Elderflower wine in summer ready to drink in winter – Food as medicine?!?

Yarrow

Yarrow's principle action is on the circulation. As the cold of winter slows down and redirects blood circulation, Yarrow dilates blood vessels allowing increased blood flow, oxygen and warmth to surface tissues (like the skin and mucous membranes).

This enables the immune cells to function at their peak, warding off infection and keeping channels clear and open. The whole flowering tops are used in a tea or other forms in mild fevers or minor congestion where circulation is a concern.

Sage

Sage is a most powerful and effective herb for treating sore throats. The different essential oils in sage exert an antiseptic effect in the respiratory tract and helps to keep both the throat and lungs free of infection. The additional effect of stimulating digestion aids to minimise congestion in other parts of the body, making fresh sage a valuable ingredient to winter recipes.

Rose hips

Rose hips form in Autumn following the rose flowers of summer. They are the fruit around the rose seed, full of nutrients to protect the seed during winter until the arrival of spring – Let them do the same for you. As a rich source of Vitamin C and flavonoids Rosehips aid with nourishing you for defense against colds and flu.

Echinacea

First used by the Indigenous North Americans who harvested the plants for extensive use in the treatment of infectious wounds and burns or eruptive skin complaints. It enhances the phagocytic activity of white blood cells- identifying and retiring bacterial, viral and fungal infections, in addition to the clearance of these from the lymphatic system. Higher doses are often used for affecting acute immune responses.

Mullein

The leaves of Mullein are used as a soothing expectorant, facilitating easier removal of lung congestion. This action is ideal during or after colds where the persistence of dampness or mucus impairs adequate lung function and clearance. Mullein soothes and strengthens the mucosal membranes of the respiratory system where these have been painful, irritated or sore from infection.

Astragalus

To be used after colds or infection to rebuild immunity, Astragalus is a sweet tasting herb effective in restoring both resilience to future respiratory infections, and efficiency of metabolism to ensure optimal nutrition for immune reserves to fight off those winter chills. This herb is the best for restoring energy to the body very quickly.

Thyme

The pungent oils found in Thyme are an effective antimicrobial in the treatment of respiratory infections. When taking Thyme, people often note tasting it on their breath as the oils permeate through the respiratory system to reduce the proliferation of viruses during infections. It also warms the digestion and reduces metabolic congestion, aiding to clear the body of conditions for infection.

Garlic

Garlic was worshiped by the ancient Egyptians, chewed by Greek Olympian athletes and thought to be essential for keeping vampires at bay! But it is also good for zapping bacteria, keeping your heart healthy, warding off coughs and colds. Garlic is an antibiotic that can actually kill infecting bacteria and at the same time protect the body from the poisons that are causing the infection.

It is known that the most sensitive bacterium to garlic is the deadly Bacillus anthracis which produces the poison anthrax. Even the forefather of antibiotic medicine Louis Pasteur acknowledged garlic to be as effective as penicillin and late studies showed similar activity to a more modern antibiotic, chloramphenicol. Even the blood of garlic eaters can kill bacteria and it is also reported that the vapour from freshly cut garlic can kill bacteria at a distance of 20 cms!

Fenugreek

Soothes sore throat pain and coughs. From ancient times through the late 19th century, fenugreek played a major role in herbal healing. Then it fell by the wayside. Now things are once again looking up for the herb whose taste is an odd combination of bitter celery and maple syrup. Modern scientific research has found that fenugreek can help reduce cholesterol levels, control diabetes and minimise the symptoms of menopause.

The ancient Greeks fed this herb to horses and cattle. The Romans then started using it, too, calling it “Greek hay.” (In Latin, “Greek hay” is foenum-graecum, and that evolved into “fenugreek.” ) As fenugreek spread around the ancient Mediterranean, physicians learned that its seeds, like many seeds, contain a gummy substance called mucilage. Mixed with water, mucilage expands and becomes a gelatinous soother for irritated tissues.

Marshmallow

Marshmallow stimulates the immune system and the production of white blood cells. It also soothes inflammation, slows production of mucus, and reduces sugar levels in the body.

Seasonal Essential Oils for Your Medicine Chest

Spring Oils

Spring is a time of new beginnings, new growth, planting seeds, purification, and for clearing out the old. Following the rhythms of nature and developing harmony with the ways in which nature cares for itself, we can also create balance within our own lives.

Jasmine

Jasmine is a bold, sweet scent and the greatest aphrodisiac of all. These night-blooming flowers are picked at their height to bring out one of the most sexy scents. Associated throughout history with the compassionate Goddess of the Moon, Jasmine, grown along the Nile in ancient Egypt, is represented Isis, the Egyptian Mother Goddess who held the secrets of fertility, magic and healing.

Patchouli

Patchouli is a sweet, earthy scent. Its smell is intense and spicy. From an energetic point of view, Patchouli, like Jasmine, is warm and yet anti-inflammatory in action. It combines a calmative property with a gentle stimulating effect that uplifts the spirit! Patchouli is a sweet and grounding harmonizing fragrance.

Neroli

Neroli is distilled from bitter orange trees. It has a refreshing, spicy aroma and is known for its sensual, exotic effect. Neroil oil is emotionally unifying and soothes with harmonizing effects. Described as both sensual and spiritual, Neroli helps to re-establish the link between a disconnected mind and body. Neroli paves the way for a gradual release and allows us to recall hope and joy.

Rose

The Mother of All Flowers, the Rose has amazing powers of love, trust and self acceptance. Roses are representative of faith, hope and love and have the qualities to restore the very center of one's being. A gentle tonic of the heart, Rose oil's psychological properties lie mainly in its effect on the mind, the center of our emotional being. Rose oil calms and supports the heart and helps to nourish the soul.

Peppermint

Peppermint oil is the most extensively used of all the volatile oils, both medicinally and commercially. The characteristic antispasmodic action of the volatile oil is more marked in this than in any other oil, and greatly adds to its power of relieving pains arising in the alimentary canal. From its stimulating, stomachic and carminative properties, peppermint is valuable in certain forms of dyspepsia, being mostly used for flatulence and colic. It may also be employed for other sudden pains and for cramp in the abdomen; wide use is made of Peppermint in cholera and diarrhea.

Lemon

Lemon is a fresh sunny scent that is cold pressed from the rind itself. Lemon has antiseptic-like properties and contains compounds that have been studied for their effects on immune function. It may serve as an insect repellent and may be beneficial for the skin. Diffuse it in your house for a fresh alternative to air spays. It complements the Oil of Oregano to neutralize the over growth of Candida. Put a few drops on a tissue and vacuum it into your vacuum bag to freshen the smell of your carpets and furniture coverings. 1 drop is also very refreshing and purifying when taken in a glass of water.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus was first employed by Australian aborigines, who not only chewed the roots for water in the dry outback, but used the leaves to treat fever, cough, and asthma, and European settlers quickly adopted it as medicine. You can also use a few drops of eucalyptus oil in boiling water or in a bath as an inhalant. Eucalyptus is often used for – Sore muscles, Insect repellent, Tension headache, Cold, Cough, Sinusitis, Rheumatoid arthritis, and Strains/sprains.

Orange

Orange essential is obtained from the rind of the fruit and used principally as a flavoring agent. Orange oil is an antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, digestive, febrifuge, phototoxic sedative, tonic. Orange oil helps spreads sunshine on gloomy thoughts and depression, has a very comforting and warming effect and dispels tension and stress and helps revive when feeling low on energy. Orange oil calms the stomach both for constipation and diarrhea. Stimulates bile which helps digestion of fats.

Orange oil has a beneficial effect on colds, bronchitis and fever. Helps with the formation of collagen – vital for tissue repair and hair growth. Also helpful with muscular pains. Helps anxiety and insomnia. Possibly reduces blood cholesterol levels. Orange oil helps dry skin conditions softening wrinkles and dermatitis. An excellent skin tonic. Orange oil can make the skin photosensitive to sunlight.

Summer Oils

Summer is a time of full growth, red, hot, joy, spiritual awareness and traveling. Life is at it’s greatest potential in the summer. Trees, plants, grasses and seeds are now at their full peak offering up the “fruits of their labor”! Take a minute to enjoy this most Yang time of energy and production! These essential oils are great for your first aid kit, as insect repellent, for soothing sunburn, freshening and cleaning! Enjoy these soothing scents for relaxing and letting go.

Bergamot

antiseptic,antiviral, antibacterial. Best for urinary tract infections, acne, skin problems, cystitis, arthritis, respiratory ailments, cold sores and herpes related ailments. Do not apply to the skin before going out into the sun for it can increase the susceptibility of the skin to severe burning (photo toxic/sensitivity)

Chamomile

antibacterial, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, diuretic, sedative, anti-allergenic, antidepressant, stomachic, vulnerary, antiemetic, carminative. digestive, febrifuge, nervine. Best for external inflammations
teething, nervousness, irritability, depression, burns, sunburn, asthma, hayfever, sprains, strains, nausea, fever. Avoid during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Citronella

antiseptic, antidepressant, deodorant, insecticide, stimulant, parasiticide. Best for bug repellent (mosquitoes, moths, fleas). Use to refresh tired and sweaty feet after exercise. Works as a germ killer

Eucalyptus

vulnerary, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antibiotic, diuretic, insecticide, stimulant, analgesic, antiviral, decongestant, expectorant, febrifuge. Best for coughs, colds, cystitis, sunburn, heat exhaustion, insect repellent. Avoid if you have high blood pressure or epilepsy. May antidote homeopathic remedies.

Grapefruit

green, bittersweet, zesty, fresh  Best for clearing toxins and improves areas of cellulite, helps with easing the chest during influenza and colds and flu. A great oil for treating anxiety and depression, easing stress
Do not apply to the skin before going out into the sun for it can increase the susceptibility of the skin
to severe burning (photo toxic/sensitivity)

Lavender

antiseptic, antibiotic, antidepressant, antispasmodic, diuretic, analgesic, nervine, immune stimulant, sedative. antiviral, carminative, decongestant, fungicide  Best for burns and blisters, wounds (cell regenerator, minimizes swelling and scarring) insect bites. stings and heat exhaustion.  Avoid during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Lemon

refreshing, stimulating, uplifting. Best for fighting infection, cools fever, stops bleeding, tightens and tones tissue,softens and soothes skin. promotes bowel movements and increases urination. Lowers both blood sugar and blood pressure. Stimulates immunity.  Do not apply to the skin before going out into the sun for it can increase the susceptibility of the skin to severe burning (photo toxic/sensitivity)

Orange

warm, fresh, citrusy, sweet. Stimulates lymphatic circulation. Best for improving immunity, fights infection, reduces inflammation, relieves muscle spasm, eases digestive disorders. Cools fever and warms chills,
calms nerves, diminishes depression.  Do not apply to the skin before going out into the sun for it can increase the susceptibility of the skin to severe burning (photo toxic/sensitivity)

Peppermint

digestive, carminative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, febrifuge, nervine, analgesic, astringent, decongestant. expectorant, stomachic, vermifuge. Best for indigestion, flatulence, halitosis. skin irritations, flu, colds, coughs, fever. headache, migraine,  fatigue, toothache, flea and ant repellent. May irritate sensitive skin and mucous membranes. Avoid during pregnancy and while nursing. May antidote homeopathic remedies.

Rosemary

antiseptic. analgesic, antirheumatic. antispasmodic, antidepressant. astringent. carminnive. cicatrisant. digestive, diuretic. stimulant. vulnerary, stomachic, nervine. Best for muscular aches and pains sprains
fatigue (mental and physical) headache, migraine, coughs, flu

Tea Tree

antiseptic, antiviral, antibacterial, antibiotic, antifungal, expectorant, insecticide, cicatrisant (wound healer). Best for infections, ringworm, athlete’s foot, sunburn, shaving, bruises and cuts, warts, pimples. May irritate sensitive skin.

Fall Oils

Fall is good time to take a good look at our health and our lifestyle. Start by looking at the life around you. Are you living in chaos? Is your home in a shambles? Is there clutter everywhere? You may want to consider starting with a good gathering and elimination session. Here are some wonderful essential oil suggestions for having a bountiful Fall.

  • Bergamot (Citrus bergamia): is a powerful antiseptic and treats anxiety and psoriasis.
  • Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica): is used for the treatment of respiratory ailments.
  • Cinnamon (Cinnamoma Cassicia): is used to relieve rheumatism and digestive disorders.
  • Clove (Eugenia aromatica): is an exceptionally warming oil, antiseptic for pain.
  • Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin): is antiseptic and anti-inflammatory used for skin care.
  • Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides): is relaxing on the nervous system, relieves tension and stress.
  • Lavender (Lavender officianalis): is essential for soothing stress, anxiety, peaceful sleep and treating burns.
  • Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia): This is a  year round germicide and antibacterial oil.

A Fall Blend:

  • Add 10 drops of Lavender
  • 5 drops of ginger
  • 2 quarts of water

Set your stove on extremely low to allow the steam to diffuse into the air. You can also do the same with a tea pot without a whistle. Remember to always watch the stove and turn it off when no adults are present.

Fall Delight:

  • Add 10 drops of Bergamot
  • 4 drops of Clove
  • 3 drops of Cinnamon
  • add to water in a diffuser

Light a tea light under the oil to gently diffuse the scent into any room.

Winter Oils

Aromatherapy brings us the aromatic energy of living plants in the form of essential oils. These fragrances are a natural antidote to the emotionally debilitating effects of winter. Aromatherapy is supportive in the winter season of quiet regeneration. Winter essential oils cleanse and freshen air in homes closed tight against the cold weather. Essential oils for winter include woody, evergreen, citrus, spice and resin oils.

Gingerbread and delicious spice cake come to mind with pungent essential oils such as clove, cinnamon, allspice, ginger and nutmeg. Fresh citrus oils including bergamot, sweet orange, lemon and tangerine recall memories of old fashioned citrus pomanders.

Warming oils include Orange, Black Pepper and Rosemary. Immune boosting oils are Tea-Tree, Lavender, Sandalwood and Bergamot. To ease congestion and fight infections use Tea-Tree, Pine, Eucalyptus and Lavender. Bergamot tea is useful for a sore throat and can be used as a gargle. Chamomile tea is very soothing and eases an upset stomach.

  • Bergamot (Citrus bergamia): Bergamot is uplifting sweet with a fruity fragrance. Helpful for depression. Refreshes a room. Avoid sunbathing and sunbeds when using this oil.
  • Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum) : Hot, dry, spicy oil with a deeply warming effect. Relieves muscular aches and pains. Stimulates the digestive, circulatory and lymphatic systems. Can irritate sensitive skin, use sparingly.
  • Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) Eucalyptus was first employed by Australian aborigines, who not only chewed the roots for water in the dry outback but used the leaves to treat fever, cough, and asthma, and European settlers quickly adopted it as medicine. You can also use a few drops of eucalyptus oil in boiling water or in a bath as an inhalant. Eucalyptus is often used for – Sore muscles, Insect repellent, Tension headache, Cold, Cough, Sinusitis, Rheumatoid arthritis and Strains/sprains. Warming and antiseptic oil with a strong camphorous medical smell.
  • Juniper Berry (Juniperus communis): Juniper Berry essential oil contains mainly pinene, myrcene, sabinene and limonene. These constituents are also found in other winter season oils including pine, cypress and fir needle. Juniper berry oil blends especially well with these oils. Juniper oil is refreshing, clarifying and uplifting to the spirit. Its physical actions are cleansing, astringent (for oily complexions) and toning. Detoxifying, cleansing and antiseptic. Do not use in pregnancy or if you suffer with kidney disease. Not suitable for children.
  • Lemon (Citrus limonum): Lemon is a fresh sunny scent that is cold pressed from the rind itself! Lemon has antiseptic-like properties and contains compounds that have been studied for their effects on immune function. It may serve as an insect repellent and may be beneficial for the skin. Diffuse it in your house for a fresh alternative to air spays. It compliments the Oil of Oregano to neutralize the over growth of Candida. Put a few drops on a tissue and vacuum it into your vacuum bag to freshen the smell of your carpets and furniture coverings. 1 drop is also very refreshing and purifying when taken in a glass of water.
  • Neroli: Neroli is distilled from bitter orange trees. It has a refreshing, spicy aroma and is known for its sensual, exotic effect. Neroil oil is emotionally unifying and soothes with harmonizing effects. Described as both sensual and spiritual, Neroli helps to re-establish the link between a disconnected mind and body. Neroli paves the way for a gradual release and allows us to recall hope and joy!
  • Orange (Citrus sinensis): Orange essential oil is obtained from the rind of the fruit and used principally as a flavoring agent. Warming, orange oil is an antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, digestive, febrifuge, phototoxic sedative, tonic. Orange oil helps spreads sunshine on gloomy thoughts and depression, has a very comforting and warming effect and dispels tension and stress and helps revive when feeling low on energy. Orange oil calms the stomach both for constipation and diarrhea. Stimulates bile which helps digestion of fats. Has a beneficial effect on colds, bronchitis and fever. Helps with the formation of collagen, vital for tissue repair and hair growth. Also helpful with muscular pains. Helps anxiety and insomnia. Possibly reduces blood cholesterol levels. Orange oil helps dry skin conditions softening wrinkles and dermatitis. An excellent skin tonic. Orange oil can make the skin photosensitive to sunlight.
  • Peppermint (Mentha piperata): Peppermint oil is the most extensively used of all the volatile oils, both medicinally and commercially. The characteristic anti-spasmodic action of the volatile oil is more marked in this than in any other oil and greatly adds to its power of relieving pains arising in the alimentary canal. From its stimulating and carminative properties, it is valuable in certain forms of dyspepsia, being mostly used for flatulence and colic. It may also be employed for other sudden pains and for cramp in the abdomen; wide use is made of Peppermint in cholera and diarrhea.
  • Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis): Rosemary is stimulating and refreshing, an invigorating pick-me-up. To help refresh and nasal passages and assist easy breathing. Excellent for hair and scalp problems including hair loss and dandruff. Do not use if pregnant or if you have high blood pressure or suffer with epilepsy.
  • Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia): Tea-Tree is a powerful antiseptic, anti-bacterial oil which helps boost the immune system. Excellent for treating cold sores and fungal infections such as thrush. Spots, insect bites, warts, cuts and grazes.

Get your dried, organic herbs, organic essential oils, bulk spices, loose leaf organic teas and aromatherapy supplies at the place where we shop – StarWest Botanicals!

Winter Essential Oil Blends

WINTER WARMTH BLEND

Combine the following oils:

  • 10 drops of cedarwood
  • 25 drops of bergamot orange
  • 15 drops of fir needle
  • 30 drops of juniper berry
  • 20 drops of sandalwood

A wintertime aromatherapy blend For a massage oil, dilute 12 drops of this “mother” blend in 3 ounces of vegetable oil. To diffuse into the air, use a candle diffuser or terra cotta ornament style diffuser. Add a few drops of “mother” blend to water in your diffuser.

SINUS CONGESTION BLEND

To relieve sinus congestion, respiratory problems and to clear a stuffy head, combine the following oils:

  • 5 drops of Eucalyptus
  • 3 drops of Lavender
  • 2 drops of Tea-Tree
  • 2 drops of Pine

Add drops to a bowl of hot water and inhale.Makes a great cold remedy. This is a powerful decongestant for those unwanted colds. Add a few drops to your burner and inhale this way.

SORE THROAT GARGLE

To soothe a sore throat and combat infection.

  • 2 drops of Tea-Tree

Add to a glass of water and use as a gargle. Do not swallow, essential oils must not be taken internally.

SEASONAL AFFECTED DISORDER (SAD)

Many people are affected in the winter months by this disorder which is associated with a reduction in sunlight, as the days get shorter, and the weather is frequently overcast. Symptoms experienced can range from depression, fatigue, lethargy, weight gain and food cravings. The following essential oils can help to relieve the symptoms associated with this disorder.

PICK ME UP BLEND

Combine the following oils:

  • 7 drops of Bergamot
  • 5 drops of Grapefruit
  • 3 drops of Rosemary

SUNSHINE BLEND

Combine the following oils:

  • 5 drops of Lemon
  • 5 drops of Orange
  • 3 drops of Geranium
  • 2 drops of Peppermint

The oils can be used in a burner, either individually or in combination.

Good Essential Oils to Have in Your First Aid Kit

Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)

  • Clary Sage is used in aromatherapy in preference to Sage (Salvia Officinalis) because Sage can be quite toxic. Clary possesses the positive effects of Sage without the danger. One should avoid the use of alcohol while using Clary Sage because the combination can bring on severe nightmares. Clary produces a heightened state akin to euphoria and relaxation. It is used in treating asthma, and during convalescence of the flu. It is used in abdominal massage for digestive problems.
  • Most valuable uses: Muscular fatigue, menstrual problems, PMS, fertility, exhaustion, insomnia, menopausal problems, calming, stress, depression, cramps, excessive perspiration.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, calmative, tonic, emmenagogue, anti-infectious, anti-spasmodic, anti-sudorific, aphrodisiac, nerve tonic, nervine, estrogen-like
  • Main chemical components: Linalol, Linalyl Acetate, Germacrene, Ceranyl acetate
  • Contraindication: Avoid during pregnancy.

Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus Radiata, etc.)

  • Eucalyptus globulus (“blue-gum”) is the most widely used variety; but Eucalyptus radiata is a better choice for aromatherapy because it has all the good properties of Eucalyptus with a sweeter aroma than the “blue-gum” variety. Eucalyptus is well known as a decongestant inhalation for colds. It reduces nasal congestion and inhibits the growth of viruses. In Australia, Eucalyptus leaves are used to bind wounds, and the oil is used in solutions to clean operation cavities and to impregnate gauze as a post-operation dressing. It is also used for burns. It is used as a pain-killing cream for shingles and in massage for rheumatism.
  • ACTIONS: Analgesic, antineuralgic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, balsamic, cicatrisant, decongestant, deodorant, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, hypoglycaemic, parasiticide, prophylactic, rubefacient, stimulant, vermifuge, vulnerary.
  • Most valuable uses: Catarrh, bronchitis, colds, flu, fever, sinusitis, muscular aches and pains, headaches, sluggishness, mental exhaustion, rheumatism, asthma, insect bites, rashes, skin ulcers, chilblains, sore throats.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, balsamic, expectorant, antibiotic, anti-fungal, febrifuge, anti-infectious, anti-parasitic, anti-neuralgic, anti-putrescent, pectoral. The antiseptic properties of this oil increase with age.
  • Main chemical components: 1,8-Cineole, para Cymene, Eucalyptol, Fenchene, Globulol, Camphene.
    Contraindication: Not to be used on children under 12 years.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

  • Do not use fennel for young children and babies because the melanthine in it can be toxic to them. Fennel must not be used by those who suffer from epilepsy. Fennel is used as a diuretic, for cellulitis, and to treat PMS. It is also used as a gargle for gum infections and in toothpaste.
  • Most valuable uses: Abdominal pain or cramps, flatulence, coughs, sore throats, digestive problems, menstrual problems, PMS, menopausal problems, fertility, obesity, nausea, fluid retention, liver problems.
  • Therapeutic properties: Carminative, emmenagogue, estrogen-like, galactagogue, depurative, diuretic, stimulant, regenerative, anti-spasmodic, antiseptic, antibiotic, vermifuge, expectorant.
  • Main chemical components: trans Anethole, Fenchone, Estragol, Methylchavicol, Fenone, aplha-pinene.
  • Contraindication: Do not use in pregnancy. Do not use on babies, or on children under 16 years. Not to be used by people subject to epilepsy. Not to be used by people with high estrogen levels. Not to be used by women with breast cancer. Not to be used by people with kidney problems, including kidney stones.

Lavender (Lavandula vera, Lavandula officinalis, Lavandula augustifolia, etc.)

  • Lavender is used to treat colds, coughs, sinusitis, flue, burns, and wounds. It is massaged into the temples for headaches, and used in massage for back pain, arthritis, and inflammation. Massaged gently into the lower abdomen, it reduces menstrual pain or scanty menstruation. Lavender is also used to treat palpitations, high blood-pressure, and skin infections.
  • ACTIONS: Analgesic, anticonvulsive, antidepressant, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, carminative, cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, deodorant, diuretic, emmenagogue, hypotensive, insecticide, nervine, parasiticide, rubefacient, sedative, stimulant, sudorific, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.
  • Most valuable uses: Cuts, grazes, burns, rheumatism, chilblains, dermatitis, eczema, sunburn, insect bites, headaches, migraine, insomnia, infections, arthritis, anxiety, tension, panic, hysteria, fatigue, inflammatory conditions, rashes, nervous conditions, dysmenorrhoea, spasms. Can be used safely on children.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, analgesic, cytophylactic, anti-spasmodic, tonic, cicatrisive, anti-inflammatory, emmenagogue, anti-venomous, anti-toxic, anti-parasitic, antitussive, diuretic, restorative, decongestant, antidepressant, calmative, sedative, antibiotic, anti-infectious.
  • Main chemical components: Linalyl Acetate, Linalool, Geraniol, Borneol, Isoborneol, Cineol-1,8.
  • Contraindication: None known.

Lemon (Citrus limonum)

  • Lemon stimulates white corpuscles to fight against infection. It is used in minor injuries to stop bleeding, and in minor cuts as a bactericide. Lemon may also be used to remove corns, warts, and verrucae. Lemon oil can cause skin irritation unless it is used in very low dilutions.
  • Most valuable uses: General tonic, infections, detoxification, general fatigue, obesity, acne, physical exhaustion, digestion, depression, rheumatism, colds and flue, skin care.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antibiotic, sedative, carminative, diuretic, haemostatic, astringent, digestive, immunostimulant, antidepressant, stimulant, antiseptic, febrifuge, calmative, antispasmodic, antisclerotic, depurative, vermifuge, cicatrisive.
  • Main chemical components: D Limonene, Citral, gamma Terpinene, Phellandrene, Citronellal, Citroptene.
  • Contraindication: Do not apply neat to the skin. Do not apply to the skin before exposure to the sun.

Peppermint (Mentha piperata)

  • Peppermint is well known for treating digestive upsets, and is used to treat colds and flu. It has a cooling effect, and is used for fevers. It is also used to stimulate the brain and bring on clear thinking. Peppermint should not be used in conjunction with homeopathic remedies, and must be stored away from these, because it can act as an antidote to them. Avoid use of peppermint in the evening because it can produce wakefulness, and avoid prolonged use of peppermint as it may disturb sleep patterns.
  • Most valuable uses: Headaches, nausea, fatigue, apathy, coughs, digestive problems, bowel disorders, flatulence, muscular pain, sinus congestion, shock, faintness, travel sickness, mouth or gum infections, mental tiredness, poor circulation.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, antibiotic, anti-infectious, carminative, stomachic, anti-spasmodic, depurative, stimulant, tonic, emmenagogue, anti-parasitic, vermifuge, expectorant, analgesic, digestive, decongestant.
  • Main chemical components: Menthol, Menthone, iso Menthone, Menthofurna, Menthol ester.
  • Contraindication: Could cause irritation if applied neat to the skin. Do not use in baths. Not to be used in pregnancy or on children under seven years.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis and Rosmarinus pyramidalis)

  • Rosemary stimulates the Central Nervous System, and is used in treatment of paralysis and memory loss. It is used to treat respiratory problems as a steam inhalation. Cautions observed with Rosemary encourage use in only small amounts because it may produce seizures or poisoning.
  • ACTIONS: Analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, fungicidal, hepatic, hypertensive, nervine, parasiticide, restorative, rubefacient, stimulant (circulatory, adrenal cortex, hepatobiliary), stomachic, sudorific, tonic (nervous, general), vulnerary.
  • Most valuable uses: Muscular pain, rheumatism, arthritis, muscular weakness, constipation, coughs, colds, bronchitis, helps eliminate toxins, memory enhancement, overwork, general debility, infections, overindulgence, hangovers, acne, exhaustion, poor circulation, cellulite, skin care, hair care, migraine, headaches, sinus problems, general tonic.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, stimulant, analgesic, rubefacient, antidepressant, anti-toxic, pectoral, vulnerary, carminative, emmenagogue, diuretic, stomachic, antitussive, decongestant.
  • Main chemical components: 1,8-Cineole, beta Pinene, Camphor, Camphene, Borneol, Bornyl acetate.
  • Contraindication: Not to be used in pregnancy. Not to be used by people with epilepsy.

Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia)

  • Tea tree is used to treat all manner of infections. It does not irritate the skin.
  • ACTIONS: Anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antiviral, bactericidal, balsamic, cicatrisant, diaphoretic, expectorant, fungicidal, immuno-stimulant, parasiticide, vulnerary.
  • Most valuable uses: Rashes, insect bites, nail fungus, dermatitis, ringworm, thrush, head lice, sore throats, boils, bronchial congestion, scabies, ulcers, wounds, arthritis, cold sores, acne, fatigue, useful for all infections.
  • Therapeutic properties: Anti-infectious, antibiotic, balsamic, anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, vulnerary, anti-inflammatory, expectorant, immunostimulant, decongestant, analgesic, antiseptic.
  • Main chemical components: Terpinene-4-ol, Paracymene, Caryophyllene, Gamma-Terpinene, Alpha-terpinene.
  • Contraindication: None known.

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

  • Thyme is used as a digestive stimulant and in treating coughs and sore throats. It is used in a toothpaste to treat mouth and gum infections. Thyme stimulates the production of white corpuscles to strengthen the body's resistance to infection. It raises low blood pressure and stimulates the appetite. It is used in baths for insomnia and is used in compresses for sores and wounds.
  • ACTIONS: Anthelmintic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiputrescent, antirheumatic, antiseptic (intestinal, pulmonary, genito-urinary), antispasmodic, antitussive, antitoxic, aperitif, astringent, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, balsamic, carminative, cicatrisant, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, fungicidal, hypertensive, nervine, revulsive, rubefacient, parasiticide, stimulant (immune system, circulation), sudorific, tonic, vermifuge.
  • Most valuable uses: All infections including viral infections, mucous congestion, colds, flu, muscular pains, arthritis, obesity, bronchitis, coughs, general debility, poor circulation, gout, physical exhaustion, throat infections, muscular debility, anorexia, acne, gum infections, thrush, verrucas, warts.
  • Therapeutic properties: Antibiotic, pectoral, analgesic, expectorant, antiseptic, balsamic, anti-infectious, anti-viral, stimulant, tonic, rubefacient, diuretic, emmenagogue, vermifuge, anti-venomous, anti-putrescent, anti-spasmodic, anti-fungal, immunostimulant.
  • Main chemical components: 6-isopropyl-m-cresol, Terpenoid, phenol thymol, isomer carvacrol, cymol, linalool, camphene.
  • Contraindication: Neither thymes are to be used in pregnancy. Not to be used in baths. Red thyme not to be used on children. Red thyme can be a mucus membrane and skin irritant so never use neat on the skin. Red thyme is one of the best anti-infectious agents when diffused in the atmosphere.

Get your dried, organic herbs, organic essential oils, bulk spices, loose leaf organic teas and aromatherapy supplies at the place where we shop – StarWest Botanicals!

Sources:

  • Encyclopaedia of Essential Oils: by Julia Lawless
  • Essential Aromatherapy: A Pocket Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy by Susan Worwood Valerie Worwood
  • A-Z Aromatherapy by Patricia Davis

Top 10 Homeopathic Remedies for Your Medicine Chest

Your Homeopathic First Aid Kit is very useful to have around the house, in the car or on vacation. Make sure your kit is readily available when you need it! This kit contains the top ten homeopathic remedies that would normally be enough to treat most first aid situations including:

  • Arnica suave all pain, bruises, sprains, strains, headaches, jet lag, sunburn
  • Arnica all pain issues, bruising, sprains, strains, headaches (taken internally)
  • Apis Mel bites, stings, fluid retention, swelling of legs and feet during travel
  • Argentum gastroenteritis, sore throat, hurriedness, stress
  • Cocculus sleep pattern disturbances, tetanus, seasickness
  • Gelsemium sore throats, cough, colds, influenza with shivering
  • Ignatia Amara irritability, hypersensitivity, hysteria, nervousness
  • Mezereum burning pain, bone pain, sensitivity to cold, headaches
  • Nux Vomica food poisoning, travel sickness, upset stomach, jet lag, hangovers, indigestion
  • Rhus Tox muscular aches, pain, stiffness, overexertion

Safe, Effective Herbal and Homeopathic Remedies

Native Remedies is the market-leading brand of natural remedies specially formulated to offer a complete solution for holistic health and wellness.

With over 500,000 customers worldwide and more than 250 herbal remedies and homeopathic remedies, we’re confident that you’ll find the holistic health products you need.

Find out how our dual-modality approach to wellness can provide fast-acting symptomatic relief (homeopathic) plus improve body function for long-term holistic health (herbal), and discover the body’s innate sense of healing with tissue salts and flower essences.

Learn more about Native Remedies.
Why do we promote this?

Andrew Pacholyk

Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac. has been in the alternative health field for over 15 years. His knowledge, expertise and clinical training has offered him the ability to experience and continually learn about the body and its energy system in health as well as in disease.

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